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Tuesday, 15 April 2014 19:48

Barefoot Running

A new trend in running and jogging has popped up recently, called barefoot running. Barefoot running is a popular and growing trend that is just what it sounds – running without shoes. Before deciding to do any running without shoes, it's best to understand how this kind of running affects the feet.

Running without shoes changes the motion of running. Most running is done by landing on the heel of the feet. Running barefoot requires a different way of running; in a barefoot stride landing is done on the front part of the feet. Because of this, the impact shifts from the heels to the front feet. Runners also shorten their strides to create a softer landing.

Running barefoot does have its advantages. When running and landing on the front feet, the impact on the feet and ankle is reduced, which may reduce the incidence of stress injuries. It strengthens muscles in the feet, and also strengthens muscles in the ankles and lower legs that aren't usually worked. Overall balance of the body is improved and there is greater sensory input from the feet to the rest of the body, making overall position and motion less stressful on the body. It has been found that in countries in which some of the population regularly wear shoes and some do not, numbers of foot and ankle injuries are much higher in those who wear shoes.

People hearing about barefoot running for the first time are skeptical about it, and there are good reasons for skepticism. Running barefoot certainly has its drawbacks, the obvious being no protection of the feet when running. This makes it likely that when runners land on sharp or rough objects, scrapes, bruises, and cuts on feet will result. Blisters will form when beginning this kind of running especially; you may have plantar fascia problems. Landing on the front feet constantly also increases the risk of getting Achilles tendonitis.

So what can runners do to make barefoot running safe? It’s best to make a slow transition from running shoes to barefoot running. The body is used to wearing shoes so to slowly transition to bare feet, start by walking barefoot for a distance and then increase walking distance. Once the feet begin to adjust, try walking and then jogging and gradually increase the distance. If you have foot problems talk to the doctor first before attempting barefoot running. When starting out, it may also be helpful to begin by running on pavement or other consistent surfaces to avoid sharp or rough objects. Minimalist running shoes may also be an option, as they allow for many of the benefits of barefoot running while also protecting the feet from cuts and scrapes. 

Published in Featured

In the beginning of March 2014, the Brooklyn Nets’ Brook Lopezhad to go through surgery to have a torn tendon repaired and to tighten loose lateral ligaments in his left ankle. Billy King, GM of the Nets, stated that Lopez suffered two ankle sprains last year, one in November and the other in December 2013. Additionally, Lopez had also fractured his fifth metatarsal in his right foot, an injury which required immediate surgery. Even in spite of his injuries the 25 year old player ranks No. 7 in the NBA in Player Efficiency Rating at the time of injury.

Ankle sprains can hurt badly. If a sprained ankle is affecting you or a loved one, come and see podiatrist Dr. Catherine J Minnick, DPM of Chicago. Dr. Minnick can treat your ankle sprain and work with you towards wellness.

How Do Ankle Sprains Happen?

Sprain injuries take place when the ligaments are torn or stretched beyond their limits. There are various ways that the ankle can become injured. In fact even the simple act of walking could cause a sprain. Ankle damage can occur by losing footing or walking on uneven terrain.

What are the Symptoms?

  • Mild to moderate bruising
  • Limited mobility
  • Swelling
  • Skin discoloration

How Can I Care for my Ankle at Home?

Self-care for ankle sprains includes propping the ankle up and keeping it elevated, applying ice packs as needed, and remaining off your feet. Some may also find that wrapping the ankle with an ACE bandage and taking over-the-counter pain relievers helps. One of the most important things is avoiding further stress to the affected area.

Preventing Sprains

  • Wearing appropriate shoes
  • Stretching before participating in physical activity
  • Knowing your limitations

To learn more about ankle sprains please follow link below.

If you have any questions, please contact our office in Chicago, IL. We offer the newest diagnostic and treatment technologies for all your foot care needs.

Read more about Ankle Sprains

Published in Blog

23 year old Australian Rules footballer Jack Steven will be off the field for about 8-10 weeks after suffering an unfortunate injury during training. As a result, the St. Kilda Saints are forced to enter against Melbourne without one of their best midfielders, with the other, Leigh Montagna, under suspension. St. Kilda’s football head Chris Pelchen further said that

“Scans conducted late this afternoon revealed a fracture in his right foot which is obviously disappointing for both Jack and the club on the eve of the 2014 season.” This revealed that Steven’s fracture was a sesamoid fracture and not a stress fracture. “It’s important to note that the fracture is not stress related and followed an innocuous incident during training.”   

A sports related foot or ankle injurycan be devastating. If you suffered a foot or ankle related injury in the game come and see podiatrist Dr. Catherine J Minnick, DPM of Chicago. Dr. Minnick can determine the scope of your injury and work with you towards rehabilitation.

Sport Related Foot And Ankle Injuries 

Foot and ankle injuries are a common occurrence when it comes to athletes of any sport. While many athletes dismiss the initial aches and pains, the truth is that ignoring potential foot and ankle injuries can lead to serious problems. As athletes continue to place pressure and strain the area further, a mild injury can turn into something as serious as a rupture and may lead to a permanent disability. There are many factors that contribute to sports related foot and ankle injuries, which include failure to warm up properly, not providing support or wearing bad footwear. Common injuries and conditions athletes face, including:

•           Plantar Fasciitis

•           Plantar Fasciosis

•           Achilles Tendinitis

•           Achilles Tendon Rupture

•           Ankle Sprains

Sports-related injuries are commonly treated using the RICE method. This includes rest, applying ice to the injured area, compression and elevating the ankle. More serious sprains and injuries may require surgery, which could include arthroscopic and reconstructive surgery. Rehabilitation and therapy may also be required in order to get any recovering athlete to become fully functional again. Any unusual aches and pains an athlete sustains must be evaluated by a licensed, reputable medical professional.

If you have any questions, please contact our office in Chicago, IL. We offer the newest diagnostic and treatment technologies for all your foot care needs.

Read more about Sports Related Foot and Ankle Injuries

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