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March 2022

Tuesday, 29 March 2022 00:00

The Early Stages of a Bunion

If you are feeling anything unusual in your big toe joint, such as tenderness, warmth, swelling, stiffness, pain, or limited range of motion, you may be in the beginning stages of developing a bunion. It takes years for a bunion to fully form, so your condition may not have progressed to the point where you can see the telltale bony bump on the outside of your big toe, nor the big toe bending unnaturally towards the other toes. Do you wear high heels or narrow, tight shoes regularly? Have you suffered a foot injury? Do you have arthritis, a neuromuscular disorder, or a family history of bunions? Any of these factors may put you more at risk of developing a painful bunion. It is important to seek treatment early for a bunion because it can help halt the progression of the condition, give your podiatrist more options for correcting the deformity, and avoid long-lasting complications. If you suspect you are developing—or have developed—a bunion, it is wise to call a podiatrist to examine, diagnose, and treat your condition.

If you are suffering from bunion pain, contact Dr. Catherine J. Minnick of Illinois. Our doctor can provide the care you need to keep you pain-free and on your feet.

What Is a Bunion?

Bunions are painful bony bumps that usually develop on the inside of the foot at the joint of the big toe. As the deformity increases over time, it may become painful to walk and wear shoes. Women are more likely to exacerbate existing bunions since they often wear tight, narrow shoes that shift their toes together. Bunion pain can be relieved by wearing wider shoes with enough room for the toes.

Causes

  • Genetics – some people inherit feet that are more prone to bunion development
  • Inflammatory Conditions - rheumatoid arthritis and polio may cause bunion development

Symptoms

  • Redness and inflammation
  • Pain and tenderness
  • Callus or corns on the bump
  • Restricted motion in the big toe

In order to diagnose your bunion, your podiatrist may ask about your medical history, symptoms, and general health. Your doctor might also order an x-ray to take a closer look at your feet. Nonsurgical treatment options include orthotics, padding, icing, changes in footwear, and medication. If nonsurgical treatments don’t alleviate your bunion pain, surgery may be necessary.

If you have any questions, please feel free to contact our offices located in Chicago, IL . We offer the newest diagnostic and treatment technologies for all your foot care needs.

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Tuesday, 22 March 2022 00:00

Why Your Heel May Be In Pain

Your feet take a pounding every day, and thankfully, the strong band of connective tissue on the sole of the feet (plantar fascia) is there to absorb a lot of this stress. However, the plantar fascia can eventually become overly stressed or damaged, and even suffer micro-tears where it attaches to the heel. This condition, known as plantar fasciitis, causes inflammation in the tissue and a great deal of heel pain. This pain may come on gradually and is usually at its worst first thing in the morning or after periods of rest. Once you start moving around the pain typically subsides, but eventually returns as the day progresses. What causes the plantar fascia to become damaged? There are many possible factors that can lead to plantar fasciitis such as: obesity, age, ill-fitting or non-supportive footwear, standing for long periods of time, excessive strain during exercise, tight Achilles’ tendons or calf muscles, running on hard surfaces, and certain foot disorders like flat feet or high arches. There are a variety of treatments that a podiatrist can administer to relieve the pain and reduced mobility associated with plantar fasciitis. If you have heel pain, it is suggested that you make an appointment with a podiatrist.

Plantar fasciitis is a common foot condition that is often caused by a strain injury. If you are experiencing heel pain or symptoms of plantar fasciitis, contact Dr. Catherine J. Minnick from Illinois. Our doctor can provide the care you need to keep you pain-free and on your feet.

What Is Plantar Fasciitis?

Plantar fasciitis is one of the most common causes of heel pain. The plantar fascia is a ligament that connects your heel to the front of your foot. When this ligament becomes inflamed, plantar fasciitis is the result. If you have plantar fasciitis you will have a stabbing pain that usually occurs with your first steps in the morning. As the day progresses and you walk around more, this pain will start to disappear, but it will return after long periods of standing or sitting.

What Causes Plantar Fasciitis?

  • Excessive running
  • Having high arches in your feet
  • Other foot issues such as flat feet
  • Pregnancy (due to the sudden weight gain)
  • Being on your feet very often

There are some risk factors that may make you more likely to develop plantar fasciitis compared to others. The condition most commonly affects adults between the ages of 40 and 60. It also tends to affect people who are obese because the extra pounds result in extra stress being placed on the plantar fascia.

Prevention

  • Take good care of your feet – Wear shoes that have good arch support and heel cushioning.
  • Maintain a healthy weight
  • If you are a runner, alternate running with other sports that won’t cause heel pain

There are a variety of treatment options available for plantar fasciitis along with the pain that accompanies it. Additionally, physical therapy is a very important component in the treatment process. It is important that you meet with your podiatrist to determine which treatment option is best for you.

If you have any questions, please feel free to contact our offices located in Chicago, IL . We offer the newest diagnostic and treatment technologies for all your foot care needs.

 

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Wednesday, 16 March 2022 00:00

Heel Pain Can Be Treated!

Do you suffer from heel pain when you get up in the morning? If so, you should seek the professional help of your podiatrist and have a proper diagnosis performed. Heel pain can be caused by several different foot-related conditions.

Published in Blog
Tuesday, 15 March 2022 00:00

Podiatrists and Diabetic Neuropathy

Neuropathy is another word for nerve damage. There are many types of neuropathy with a variety of underlying causes. The most common type of neuropathy seen by podiatrists is diabetic neuropathy. As its name suggests, diabetic peripheral neuropathy is a result of diabetes. High blood sugar levels damage the nerves that supply the feet and lower limbs, leading to symptoms such as burning pain, numbness, tingling, a loss of sensation, muscle weakness, skin discoloration, and a higher chance of diabetic foot ulcers. Diabetic neuropathy can range from mild to severe but tends to worsen if steps aren’t taken to treat it. Your podiatrist can help you manage diabetic neuropathy by monitoring the health of your feet, prescribing orthotics, taking care of any injuries or foot wounds, and much more.

Neuropathy

Neuropathy can be a potentially serious condition, especially if it is left undiagnosed. If you have any concerns that you may be experiencing nerve loss in your feet, consult with Dr. Catherine J. Minnick from Illinois. Our doctor will assess your condition and provide you with quality foot and ankle treatment for neuropathy.

What Is Neuropathy?

Neuropathy is a condition that leads to damage to the nerves in the body. Peripheral neuropathy, or neuropathy that affects your peripheral nervous system, usually occurs in the feet. Neuropathy can be triggered by a number of different causes. Such causes include diabetes, infections, cancers, disorders, and toxic substances.

Symptoms of Neuropathy Include:

  • Numbness
  • Sensation loss
  • Prickling and tingling sensations
  • Throbbing, freezing, burning pains
  • Muscle weakness

Those with diabetes are at serious risk due to being unable to feel an ulcer on their feet. Diabetics usually also suffer from poor blood circulation. This can lead to the wound not healing, infections occurring, and the limb may have to be amputated.

Treatment

To treat neuropathy in the foot, podiatrists will first diagnose the cause of the neuropathy. Figuring out the underlying cause of the neuropathy will allow the podiatrist to prescribe the best treatment, whether it be caused by diabetes, toxic substance exposure, infection, etc. If the nerve has not died, then it’s possible that sensation may be able to return to the foot.

Pain medication may be issued for pain. Electrical nerve stimulation can be used to stimulate nerves. If the neuropathy is caused from pressure on the nerves, then surgery may be necessary.

If you have any questions, please feel free to contact our offices located in Chicago, IL . We offer the newest diagnostic and treatment technologies for all your foot care needs.

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Tuesday, 08 March 2022 00:00

I Have a Foot Wart - Should I Be Worried?

Warts on the sole of your foot or toes, known as plantar warts or verrucas, are caused by a viral infection of the skin. The virus enters your body through a cut, scrape, or other small opening in the skin and produces one or more grainy, flesh-colored warts with small black dots in the center. Most warts are painless, though some may be uncomfortable if they are located on a weight-bearing area, like the heel or ball of the foot. Fortunately, most plantar warts go away on their own, but this can take quite some time, ranging from months to years. To speed up recovery, you may wish to seek treatment from a podiatrist. It is also a good idea to consult with a podiatrist if you have a medical condition like diabetes or immune insufficiency, which can make plantar warts a more serious concern. 

Plantar warts can be very uncomfortable. If you need your feet checked, contact Dr. Catherine J. Minnick from Illinois. Our doctor will assist you with all of your foot and ankle needs.

About Plantar Warts

Plantar warts are the result of HPV, or human papillomavirus, getting into open wounds on the feet. They are mostly found on the heels or balls of the feet.

While plantar warts are generally harmless, those experiencing excessive pain or those suffering from diabetes or a compromised immune system require immediate medical care. Plantar warts are easily diagnosed, usually through scraping off a bit of rough skin or by getting a biopsy.

Symptoms

  • Lesions on the bottom of your feet, usually rough and grainy
  • Hard or thick callused spots
  • Wart seeds, which are small clotted blood vessels that look like little black spots
  • Pain, discomfort, or tenderness of your feet when walking or standing

Treatment

  • Freezing
  • Electric tool removal
  • Laser Treatment
  • Topical Creams (prescription only)
  • Over-the-counter medications

To help prevent developing plantar warts, avoid walking barefoot over abrasive surfaces that can cause cuts or wounds for HPV to get into. Avoiding direct contact with other warts, as well as not picking or rubbing existing warts, can help prevent the further spread of plantar warts. However, if you think you have developed plantar warts, speak to your podiatrist. He or she can diagnose the warts on your feet and recommend the appropriate treatment options.

If you have any questions please feel free to contact our offices located in Chicago, IL . We offer the newest diagnostic and treatment technologies for all your foot and ankle needs.

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If you drop something on your foot, it will likely turn purple or blue from bruising. This is normal, and the common solutions of rest, ice, elevation, and compression should help ease the pain as your foot heals. However, chronic discoloration of the feet can be a sign of restricted blood flow brought on by other conditions. Among them are diabetic neuropathy, peripheral artery disease (PAD), lupus, or Raynaud’s disease. In some way all of these conditions limit the flow of blood to the extremities and can cause foot swelling, discoloration and numbness. If you notice that your feet have changed color for longer periods, it may be wise to consult a podiatrist who can offer a complete examination and diagnosis of your feet and recommend the best treatment options for you.

Everyday foot care is very important to prevent infection and other foot ailments. If you need your feet checked, contact Dr. Catherine J. Minnick from Illinois. Our doctor can provide the care you need to keep you pain-free and on your feet.

Everyday Foot Care

Often, people take care of their bodies, face and hair more so than they do for their feet. But the feet are a very important aspect of our bodies, and one that we should pay more attention to. Without our feet, we would not be able to perform most daily tasks.

It is best to check your feet regularly to make sure there are no new bruises or cuts that you may not have noticed before. For dry feet, moisturizer can easily be a remedy and can be applied as often as necessary to the affected areas. Wearing shoes that fit well can also help you maintain good foot health, as well as making it easier to walk and do daily activities without the stress or pain of ill-fitting shoes, high heels, or even flip flops. Wearing clean socks with closed shoes is important to ensure that sweat and bacteria do not accumulate within the shoe. Clean socks help to prevent Athlete’s foot, fungi problems, bad odors, and can absorb sweat.

If you have any questions please feel free to contact our offices located in Chicago, IL . We offer the newest diagnostic and treatment technologies for all your foot and ankle needs.

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