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Podiatry Chicago, IL main menu

July 2020

Your feet are covered most of the day. If you're diabetic, periodic screening is important for good health. Numbness is often a sign of diabetic foot and can mask a sore or wound.

Published in Blog
Monday, 20 July 2020 00:00

Ways to Improve Poor Circulation

The circulatory system transports oxygen, nutrients, and blood throughout the body. Poor circulation is when blood flow to various parts of the body is inadequate. Frequently, poor circulation occurs in the legs and feet. Fortunately, there are ways you can improve poor circulation. Eating a balanced diet, drinking more water, exercising, and quitting smoking are all actions that you can take to improve your overall health, in addition to improving your circulation. Elevating your feet, getting a foot massage, taking warm baths, using a compression garment can also improve poor circulation. You should also see your doctor regularly for checkups to monitor your circulation. If you experience poor circulation to your legs and feet, a podiatrist can also help by finding treatments that work for you.

Poor circulation is a serious condition and needs immediate medical attention. If you have any concerns with poor circulation in your feet contact Dr. Catherine J. Minnick of Illinois. Our doctor will treat your foot and ankle needs.

Poor Circulation in the Feet

Poor blood circulation in the feet and legs is can be caused by peripheral artery disease (PAD), which is the result of a buildup of plaque in the arteries.

Plaque buildup or atherosclerosis results from excess calcium and cholesterol in the bloodstream. This can restrict the amount of blood which can flow through the arteries. Poor blood circulation in the feet and legs are sometimes caused by inflammation in the blood vessels, known as vasculitis.

Causes

Lack of oxygen and oxygen from poor blood circulation restricts muscle growth and development. It can also cause:

  • Muscle pain, stiffness, or weakness   
  • Numbness or cramping in the legs 
  • Skin discoloration
  • Slower nail & hair growth
  • Erectile dysfunction

Those who have diabetes or smoke are at greatest risk for poor circulation, as are those who are over 50. If you have poor circulation in the feet and legs it may be caused by PAD and is important to make changes to your lifestyle in order to reduce risk of getting a heart attack or stroke. Exercise and maintaining a healthy lifestyle will dramatically improve conditions.

As always, see a podiatrist as he or she will assist in finding a regimen that suits you. A podiatrist can also prescribe you any needed medication. 

If you have any questions please feel free to contact our offices located in Chicago, IL. We offer the newest diagnostic and treatment technologies for all your foot and ankle needs.

Read more about Causes, Symptoms, and Treatment of Poor Blood Circulation in the Feet
Published in Blog
Monday, 13 July 2020 00:00

Babies, Children, and Flat Feet

“Pes Planus” is the medical term for the foot condition known as flat feet. It can also be referred to as fallen arches and is noticeable while standing on the floor. Many babies are born with flat feet, and the arch will typically develop by the age of six. Some children have calf muscles that are inflexible, and this may affect arch development as well. Mild relief may be found when proper shoes are worn, and it may help to perform specific foot stretches. If the muscles in the feet are weak, it may be beneficial to walk on varied surfaces that can consist of grass and sand. If your child has not developed arches in their feet, it is strongly advised that you seek the counsel of a podiatrist who can determine what the best course of treatment is.

Flatfoot is a condition many people suffer from. If you have flat feet, contact Dr. Catherine J. Minnick from Illinois. Our doctor will treat your foot and ankle needs.

What Are Flat Feet?

Flatfoot is a condition in which the arch of the foot is depressed and the sole of the foot is almost completely in contact with the ground. About 20-30% of the population generally has flat feet because their arches never formed during growth.

Conditions & Problems:

Having flat feet makes it difficult to run or walk because of the stress placed on the ankles.

Alignment – The general alignment of your legs can be disrupted, because the ankles move inward which can cause major discomfort.

Knees – If you have complications with your knees, flat feet can be a contributor to arthritis in that area.  

Symptoms

  • Pain around the heel or arch area
  • Trouble standing on the tip toe
  • Swelling around the inside of the ankle
  • Flat look to one or both feet
  • Having your shoes feel uneven when worn

Treatment

If you are experiencing pain and stress on the foot you may weaken the posterior tibial tendon, which runs around the inside of the ankle. 

If you have any questions please feel free to contact our offices located in Chicago, IL. We offer the newest diagnostic and treatment technologies for all your foot and ankle needs.

Read more about Flatfoot
Published in Blog

For elderly patients especially, ensuring that your living conditions are safe can help to prevent falling. Falling can be a serious issue, particularly for those 65 and older, as it can cause foot conditions. Once a patient experiences a fall, they may develop a fear of falling, which can negatively impact how they go about their day to day activities. Staying active and regularly seeing a doctor are both great ways to implement falls prevention.  Another aspect of preventing falls that is extremely important is having a safe living environment. To achieve this, some patients have grab bars installed in their home, typically in the bathroom, to help prevent slipping. Another tactic that can be helpful to make sure there are no tripping hazards in your home is to ensure all carpets and throw rugs are secured, either with double-sided tape, or by purchasing non-skid rugs. For more advice on how to best prevent falling, please consult with a podiatrist.

Preventing falls among the elderly is very important. If you are older and have fallen or fear that you are prone to falling, consult with Dr. Catherine J. Minnick from Illinois. Our doctor will assess your condition and provide you with quality advice and care.

Every 11 seconds, an elderly American is being treated in an emergency room for a fall related injury. Falls are the leading cause of head and hip injuries for those 65 and older. Due to decreases in strength, balance, senses, and lack of awareness, elderly persons are very susceptible to falling. Thankfully, there are a number of things older persons can do to prevent falls.

How to Prevent Falls

Some effective methods that older persons can do to prevent falls include:

  • Enrolling in strength and balance exercise program to increase balance and strength
  • Periodically having your sight and hearing checked
  • Discuss any medications you have with a doctor to see if it increases the risk of falling
  • Clearing the house of falling hazards and installing devices like grab bars and railings
  • Utilizing a walker or cane
  • Wearing shoes that provide good support and cushioning
  • Talking to family members about falling and increasing awareness

Falling can be a traumatic and embarrassing experience for elderly persons; this can make them less willing to leave the house, and less willing to talk to someone about their fears of falling. Doing such things, however, will increase the likelihood of tripping or losing one’s balance. Knowing the causes of falling and how to prevent them is the best way to mitigate the risk of serious injury.  

If you have any questions, please feel free to contact our offices located in Chicago, IL. We offer the newest diagnostic and treatment technologies for all your foot care needs.

Read more about Falls Prevention
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