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December 2019

Monday, 30 December 2019 00:00

Morton’s Neuroma and Pinched Nerves

A pinched nerve that is located between the toes may be referred to as Morton’s Neuroma. It may occur as a result of an injury that happened to the foot, and the pain that is felt is generally on the ball of the foot as it radiates from the toes. When a diagnosis is performed, the range of motion is checked, and this is helpful in looking for arthritis or inflamed joints. Additionally, it is important that an X-ray or MRI is performed, as this may be beneficial in ruling out other ailments. Moderate relief may be found when the correct shoes are worn, and it may help to add support to the affected area by taping the foot. If you are afflicted with Morton’s Neuroma, it is advised that you speak to a podiatrist who can guide you toward the proper treatment, which may include surgery.

Morton’s neuroma is a very uncomfortable condition to live with. If you think you have Morton’s neuroma, contact Dr. Catherine J. Minnick of Illinois. Our doctor will attend to all of your foot care needs and answer any of your related questions.  

Morton’s Neuroma

Morton's neuroma is a painful foot condition that commonly affects the areas between the second and third or third and fourth toe, although other areas of the foot are also susceptible. Morton’s neuroma is caused by an inflamed nerve in the foot that is being squeezed and aggravated by surrounding bones.

What Increases the Chances of Having Morton’s Neuroma?

  • Ill-fitting high heels or shoes that add pressure to the toe or foot
  • Jogging, running or any sport that involves constant impact to the foot
  • Flat feet, bunions, and any other foot deformities

Morton’s neuroma is a very treatable condition. Orthotics and shoe inserts can often be used to alleviate the pain on the forefront of the feet. In more severe cases, corticosteroids can also be prescribed. In order to figure out the best treatment for your neuroma, it’s recommended to seek the care of a podiatrist who can diagnose your condition and provide different treatment options.

If you have any questions, please feel free to contact our offices located in Chicago, IL. We offer the newest diagnostic and treatment technologies for all your foot care needs.

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Published in Blog
Friday, 27 December 2019 00:00

Are Bunions Affecting Your Everyday Life?

Have you noticed a bony protrusion on the side of your big toe? If so, you may have developed the foot condition known as a bunion. Don't let bunions interfere with your daily activities.

Published in Blog
Monday, 23 December 2019 00:00

Signs You May have a Fungal Nail Infection

Fungal nail infections normally form slowly and often are very uncomfortable. There are many signs that can indicate if you have picked up a fungal nail infection. Discoloration of the nail is one giveaway you may have developed this condition. The nail will usually turn yellow, green, black, or white if it has been infected. The nail may also thicken, as well as turn into an abnormal shape, making it hard to trim and care for. Brittleness is another sign of a fungal infection. In certain cases, an infected nail may crumble, or fall off if not treated properly. It is likely to pick up a fungal infection by walking barefoot in environments that are warm and damp. These areas may include locker rooms or communal showers. Not properly washing and drying your feet on a daily basis, as well as not changing your socks and shoes can also be a factor in developing this condition. If you believe you have a fungal nail infection and would like more information on how to treat it, we recommend you consult with a podiatrist for professional care and a proper diagnosis.

For more information about treatment, contact Dr. Catherine J. Minnick of Illinois. Our doctor can provide the care you need to keep you pain-free and on your feet.

Toenail Fungus Treatment

Toenail fungus is a condition that affects many people and can be especially hard to get rid of. Fortunately, there are several methods to go about treating and avoiding it.

Antifungals & Deterrence

Oral antifungal medicine has been shown to be effective in many cases. It is important to consult with a podiatrist to determine the proper regiment for you, or potentially explore other options.

Applying foot powder on the feet and shoes helps keep the feet free of moisture and sweat.

Sandals or open toed shoes – Wearing these will allow air movement and help keep feet dry. They also expose your feet to light, which fungus cannot tolerate. Socks with moisture wicking material also help as well.

If you have any questions please feel free to contact our offices located in Chicago, IL. We offer the newest diagnostic tools and technology to treat your foot and ankle needs.

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Published in Blog
Monday, 16 December 2019 00:00

How Does Gout Form?

Gout is a foot condition that can be brought upon by the buildup of uric acid due to high levels of purines. Uric acid can increase due to hereditary conditions as well as complications with the kidneys. Certain foods to avoid that are high in purine levels include red meats, red wine, oily fish, and certain vegetables. Obesity and high blood pressure are also linked to the formation of gout. Those with gout often experience severe joint pain, swelling, redness, and sensitivity in the joints of the foot. For more information about gout and a proper diagnosis, we recommend you meet with a podiatrist to discuss your treatment options.

Gout is a painful condition that can be treated. If you are seeking treatment, contact Dr. Catherine J. Minnick from Illinois. Our doctor will treat your foot and ankle needs.

What Is Gout?

Gout is a form of arthritis that is characterized by sudden, severe attacks of pain, redness, and tenderness in the joints. The condition usually affects the joint at the base of the big toe. A gout attack can occur at any random time, such as the middle of the night while you are asleep.

Symptoms

  • Intense Joint Pain - Usually around the large joint of your big toe, and it most severe within the first four to twelve hours
  • Lingering Discomfort - Joint discomfort may last from a few days to a few weeks
  • Inflammation and Redness -Affected joints may become swollen, tender, warm and red
  • Limited Range of Motion - May experience a decrease in joint mobility

Risk Factors

  • Genetics - If family members have gout, you’re more likely to have it
  • Medications - Diuretic medications can raise uric acid levels
  • Gender/Age - Gout is more common in men until the age of 60. It is believed that estrogen protects women until that point
  • Diet - Eating red meat and shellfish increases your risk
  • Alcohol - Having more than two alcoholic drinks per day increases your risk
  • Obesity - Obese people are at a higher risk for gout

Prior to visiting your podiatrist to receive treatment for gout, there are a few things you should do beforehand. If you have gout you should write down your symptoms--including when they started and how often you experience them, important medical information you may have, and any questions you may have. Writing down these three things will help your podiatrist in assessing your specific situation so that he or she may provide the best route of treatment for you.

If you have any questions, please feel free to contact our offices located in Chicago, IL. We offer the newest diagnostic and treatment technologies for all your foot care needs.

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Published in Blog
Saturday, 07 December 2019 00:00

Foot Ulcers and Proper Treatment

Many diabetic patients are aware of the importance of properly taking care of wounds on their feet. Foot ulcers can be common in these types of patients, and can become worse as a result of damaged nerve endings that may accompany diabetes. This may cause the patient to lose feeling in the feet, making it possible that wounds on the feet are left undetected. If an existing wound becomes infected, it may develop into a foot ulcer. One of the first steps in treating a foot ulcer is to remove the affected wound tissue. This can be beneficial in helping the wound to drain, in addition to effectively examining the tissue that lies beneath it. Patients who have foot ulcers may be guided to wear a specific type of boot, or offloading device. This is a necessary step for successful healing. There are measures that can be taken which may help to prevent wounds on the feet. These can include examining the feet daily, washing and drying the feet thoroughly, and making sure blood glucose levels are within a normal range. If you have wounds on your feet, it is strongly suggested that you are under the care of a podiatrist who can help you to properly manage this condition

Wound care is an important part in dealing with diabetes. If you have diabetes and a foot wound or would like more information about wound care for diabetics, consult with Dr. Catherine J. Minnick from Illinois. Our doctor will assess your condition and provide you with quality foot and ankle treatment.

What Is Wound Care?

Wound care is the practice of taking proper care of a wound. This can range from the smallest to the largest of wounds. While everyone can benefit from proper wound care, it is much more important for diabetics. Diabetics often suffer from poor blood circulation which causes wounds to heal much slower than they would in a non-diabetic. 

What Is the Importance of Wound Care?

While it may not seem apparent with small ulcers on the foot, for diabetics, any size ulcer can become infected. Diabetics often also suffer from neuropathy, or nerve loss. This means they might not even feel when they have an ulcer on their foot. If the wound becomes severely infected, amputation may be necessary. Therefore, it is of the upmost importance to properly care for any and all foot wounds.

How to Care for Wounds

The best way to care for foot wounds is to prevent them. For diabetics, this means daily inspections of the feet for any signs of abnormalities or ulcers. It is also recommended to see a podiatrist several times a year for a foot inspection. If you do have an ulcer, run the wound under water to clear dirt from the wound; then apply antibiotic ointment to the wound and cover with a bandage. Bandages should be changed daily and keeping pressure off the wound is smart. It is advised to see a podiatrist, who can keep an eye on it.

If you have any questions, please feel free to contact our offices located in Chicago, IL. We offer the newest diagnostic and treatment technologies for all your foot care needs.

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Published in Blog
Sunday, 01 December 2019 00:00

Have I Broken My Toe?

Common causes of a broken toe typically include a heavy object falling on one or more of your toes, or stubbing your toe against a piece of furniture. The affected toe may look swollen, bruised, and can be difficult to walk on. If the fracture is severe, the toe may look crooked and deformed, and this may cause severe pain and discomfort. Patients who have broken toes may choose to use buddy taping as a form of treatment. This method involves taping the broken toe to an adjacent toe, and can be effective in providing the stability that is necessary as the healing process occurs. After a proper diagnosis is performed, which typically involves having an X-ray taken, treatment can begin. If you have broken your toe, it is advised that you consult with a podiatrist who can help you to effectively manage this type of fracture.

A broken toe can be very painful and lead to complications if not properly fixed. If you have any concerns about your feet, contact Dr. Catherine J. Minnick from Illinois. Our doctor will treat your foot and ankle needs.

What to Know About a Broken Toe

Although most people try to avoid foot trauma such as banging, stubbing, or dropping heavy objects on their feet, the unfortunate fact is that it is a common occurrence. Given the fact that toes are positioned in front of the feet, they typically sustain the brunt of such trauma. When trauma occurs to a toe, the result can be a painful break (fracture).

Symptoms of a Broken Toe

  • Throbbing pain
  • Swelling
  • Bruising on the skin and toenail
  • The inability to move the toe
  • Toe appears crooked or disfigured
  • Tingling or numbness in the toe

Generally, it is best to stay off of the injured toe with the affected foot elevated.

Severe toe fractures may be treated with a splint, cast, and in some cases, minor surgery. Due to its position and the pressure it endures with daily activity, future complications can occur if the big toe is not properly treated.

If you have any questions please feel free to contact our offices located in Chicago, IL. We offer the newest diagnostic and treatment technologies for all your foot and ankle needs.

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