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Tuesday, 25 January 2022 00:00

A corn is a hard, yellowed bump or lump just under the skin of the toe or foot. It often develops when the toe rubs against the inside of your shoe, causing pain. People with diabetes or poor circulation may be more apt to develop corns. There are several treatments that can remove or eliminate corns, but if the underlying cause is not corrected, they are likely to recur. Pressure and repetitive friction are the main causes of corns and calluses on the feet. Wearing shoes that are not too tight, or too loose, can help reduce the pressure on the toes. When shoes are too tight or heels too high they can compress the foot; when they are too loose, the foot may slide and rub against them. A seam or stitching on the shoe also can cause repetitive friction. The best way to avoid corns is to wear shoes with room in the toe box, and socks that absorb moisture. Soaking the feet periodically helps soften the corns. For removal of a corn, it is suggested that you make an appointment with a podiatrist for safe treatment and prevention planning.

If you have any concerns regarding your feet and ankles, contact Dr. Catherine J. Minnick of Illinois. Our doctor will treat your foot and ankle needs.

Corns: What Are They? and How Do You Get Rid of Them?
Corns can be described as areas of the skin that have thickened to the point of becoming painful or irritating. They are often layers and layers of the skin that have become dry and rough, and are normally smaller than calluses.

Ways to Prevent Corns
There are many ways to get rid of painful corns such as wearing:

  • Well-fitting socks
  • Comfortable shoes that are not tight around your foot
  • Shoes that offer support

Treating Corns
Treatment of corns involves removing the dead skin that has built up in the specific area of the foot. Consult with Our doctor to determine the best treatment option for your case of corns.

If you have any questions please feel free to contact our offices located in Chicago, IL . We offer the newest diagnostic and treatment technologies for all your foot and ankle needs.

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Tuesday, 18 January 2022 00:00

About one-fifth of adults in the United States experience cracked heels, studies show. Besides being unsightly, cracked heels that deepen can also become painful and lead to bleeding. Because there are no oil glands on the feet, they often become dried out. In addition, medical conditions such as diabetes, psoriasis and eczema can promote cracked heels. One of the simplest remedies for cracked heels is a petroleum jelly treatment. It helps reduce moisture loss from the skin and keeps it hydrated. Soak your feet in warm water for about 15 minutes, and then use a pumice stone to scrub off the dried skin. Rinse and pat dry thoroughly. Next, apply moisture lotion to the affected area and cover that with petroleum jelly to seal it in. Put on a pair of wool socks overnight and wash your feet again the next morning. If cracked heels continue to give you problems, it is suggested that you visit a podiatrist who can recommend further treatment options.

If the skin on your feet starts to crack, you may want to see a podiatrist to find treatment. If you have any concerns, contact Dr. Catherine J. Minnick from Illinois. Our doctor can provide the care you need to keep you pain-free and on your feet.

Cracked Heels

It is important to moisturize your cracked heels in order to prevent pain, bleeding, and infection. The reason cracked heels form is because the skin on the foot is too dry to support the immense pressure placed on them. When the foot expands, the dry skin on the foot begins to split.

Ways to Help Heal Them

  • Invest in a good foot cream
  • Try Using Petroleum Jelly
  • Ease up on Soaps
  • Drink Plenty of Water

Ways to Prevent Cracked Heels

  • Moisturize After Showering
  • Skip a Shower
  • Keep Shower Water Lukewarm
  • Don’t Scrub Your Feet

If you are unsure how to proceed in treating cracked heels, seek guidance from a podiatrist. Your doctor will help you with any questions or information you may need. 

If you have any questions, please feel free to contact our offices located in Chicago, IL . We offer the newest diagnostic and treatment technologies for all your foot care needs.

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Saturday, 15 January 2022 00:00

Plantar warts are small growths that develop on parts of the feet that bear weight. They're typically found on the bottom of the foot. Don't live with plantar warts, and call us today!

Tuesday, 11 January 2022 00:00

Uric acid is produced as a by-product when the body breaks down purines contained in some of the foods we eat. When uric acid cannot be properly flushed, it can accumulate and crystalize on the joints: most commonly, the big toe joint. If this condition called gout goes untreated, nodules (tophi) can form which can be very painful and debilitating. In these cases where the disease has progressed or infection has set in (and more conservative treatments have not worked), surgery may be necessary. There are different surgical approaches to remove gouty deposits and tophic masses while preserving surrounding tissue. In extreme cases when the joint is severely damaged or unstable, joint replacement or fusion may be necessary to reduce pain. If you have episodes of sharp pain in the joint of the big toe, it is a good idea to make an appointment with a podiatrist to have your condition properly diagnosed and to explore your treatment options.

Gout is a painful condition that can be treated. If you are seeking treatment, contact Dr. Catherine J. Minnick from Illinois. Our doctor will treat your foot and ankle needs.

What Is Gout?

Gout is a form of arthritis that is characterized by sudden, severe attacks of pain, redness, and tenderness in the joints. The condition usually affects the joint at the base of the big toe. A gout attack can occur at any random time, such as the middle of the night while you are asleep.

Symptoms

  • Intense Joint Pain - Usually around the large joint of your big toe, and it most severe within the first four to twelve hours
  • Lingering Discomfort - Joint discomfort may last from a few days to a few weeks
  • Inflammation and Redness -Affected joints may become swollen, tender, warm and red
  • Limited Range of Motion - May experience a decrease in joint mobility

Risk Factors

  • Genetics - If family members have gout, you’re more likely to have it
  • Medications - Diuretic medications can raise uric acid levels
  • Gender/Age - Gout is more common in men until the age of 60. It is believed that estrogen protects women until that point
  • Diet - Eating red meat and shellfish increases your risk
  • Alcohol - Having more than two alcoholic drinks per day increases your risk
  • Obesity - Obese people are at a higher risk for gout

Prior to visiting your podiatrist to receive treatment for gout, there are a few things you should do beforehand. If you have gout you should write down your symptoms--including when they started and how often you experience them, important medical information you may have, and any questions you may have. Writing down these three things will help your podiatrist in assessing your specific situation so that he or she may provide the best route of treatment for you.

If you have any questions, please feel free to contact our offices located in Chicago, IL . We offer the newest diagnostic and treatment technologies for all your foot care needs.

Read more about Everything You Need to Know About Gout
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