If you need a more accessible version of this website, click this button on the right.Switch to Accessible Site
Podiatry Chicago, IL main menu
Tuesday, 19 October 2021 00:00

Joint deformities are sometimes a complication of rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Fortunately, joint deformities are becoming less common thanks to early detection and treatment. Nevertheless, it is helpful to be aware of joint deformity caused by RA and what can be done to treat it. The most common types of joint deformities in the feet of people with RA are claw, mallet, and hammertoes. People with these deformities have toes that are stuck in a bent position at one of the toe joints. These conditions can be treated through the use of orthotic devices, such as insoles or splints, or with surgery. If you have RA, it is suggested that you are under the care of a podiatrist who can help you maintain your foot health. 

Because RA affects more than just your joints, including the joints in your feet and ankles, it is important to seek early diagnosis from your podiatrist if you feel like the pain in your feet might be caused by RA. For more information, contact Dr. Catherine J. Minnick of Illinois. Our doctor will assist you with all of your podiatric concerns.

What Is Rheumatoid Arthritis?

Rheumatoid Arthritis (RA) is an autoimmune disorder in which the body’s own immune system attacks the membranes surrounding the joints. Inflammation of the lining and eventually the destruction of the joint’s cartilage and bone occur, causing severe pain and immobility.

Rheumatoid Arthritis of the Feet

Although RA usually attacks multiple bones and joints throughout the entire body, almost 90 percent of cases result in pain in the foot or ankle area.

Symptoms

  • Swelling and pain in the feet
  • Stiffness in the feet
  • Pain on the ball or sole of feet
  • Joint shift and deformation

Diagnosis

Quick diagnosis of RA in the feet is important so that the podiatrist can treat the area effectively. Your doctor will ask you about your medical history, occupation, and lifestyle to determine the origin of the condition. Rheumatoid Factor tests help to determine if someone is affected by the disease.

If you have any questions please feel free to contact our offices located in Chicago, IL . We offer the newest diagnostic and treatment technologies for all your foot and ankle needs.

Read more about Rheumatoid Arthritis in the Feet
Sunday, 17 October 2021 00:00

Have you noticed a bony protrusion on the side of your big toe? If so, you may have developed the foot condition known as a bunion. Don't let bunions interfere with your daily activities.

Tuesday, 12 October 2021 00:00

Although diabetes is known primarily for affecting blood sugar, it has cascading effects on every part of the body, including the feet. People with diabetes need to be extra attentive to the health of their feet because diabetes can impair circulation and nerve function in the feet, leading to an increased risk of developing poorly healing foot wounds. When washing the feet, use a gentle soap and lukewarm water, then dry your feet thoroughly, particularly between the toes. Moisturize the tops and bottoms of your feet (but not the toes) to prevent dry skin, and see a podiatrist if you have corns, calluses, cracked heels, or other skin problems. Trim your toenails straight across and not too short to prevent ingrown toenails. Finally, inspect the feet daily for any unusual sensations or changes in appearance, such as new or worsening cuts, scrapes, sores, or discoloration. If you notice anything amiss, please see a podiatrist for treatment as soon as possible. 

Diabetic foot care is important in preventing foot ailments such as ulcers. If you are suffering from diabetes or have any other concerns about your feet, contact Dr. Catherine J. Minnick from Illinois. Our doctor can provide the care you need to keep you pain-free and on your feet.

Diabetic Foot Care

Diabetes affects millions of people every year. The condition can damage blood vessels in many parts of the body, especially the feet. Because of this, taking care of your feet is essential if you have diabetes, and having a podiatrist help monitor your foot health is highly recommended.

The Importance of Caring for Your Feet

  • Routinely inspect your feet for bruises or sores.
  • Wear socks that fit your feet comfortably.
  • Wear comfortable shoes that provide adequate support.

Patients with diabetes should have their doctor monitor their blood levels, as blood sugar levels play such a huge role in diabetic care. Monitoring these levels on a regular basis is highly advised.

It is always best to inform your healthcare professional of any concerns you may have regarding your feet, especially for diabetic patients. Early treatment and routine foot examinations are keys to maintaining proper health, especially because severe complications can arise if proper treatment is not applied.

If you have any questions please feel free to contact our offices located in Chicago, IL . We offer the newest diagnostic and treatment technologies for all your foot and ankle needs.

Read more about Diabetic Foot Care
Tuesday, 05 October 2021 00:00

Millions of people in America suffer from diabetes, which often leads to complications in their feet. Diabetes impairs the body’s ability to regulate blood glucose levels. This, in turn, disrupts the functionality of white blood cells which are critical in closing wounds. Additionally, diabetes can lead to poor circulation, and this reduces the amount of nutrients sent to wound sites and further impairs the healing process. Neuropathy, or nerve damage, is another condition associated with diabetes. Neuropathy further complicates diabetic wound management because it can prevent diabetic adults from feeling when there is trauma or an injury to their skin, and wounds may progress before they are even discovered. All of these factors combined make the diabetic wound harder to detect and heal, which may lead to infection and worse—if it's not treated properly. If you are diabetic, it's important to be under the care of a podiatrist who can offer preventative measures against foot wounds and treat them promptly and properly if they do develop.

Wound care is an important part in dealing with diabetes. If you have diabetes and a foot wound or would like more information about wound care for diabetics, consult with Dr. Catherine J. Minnick from Illinois. Our doctor will assess your condition and provide you with quality foot and ankle treatment.

What Is Wound Care?

Wound care is the practice of taking proper care of a wound. This can range from the smallest to the largest of wounds. While everyone can benefit from proper wound care, it is much more important for diabetics. Diabetics often suffer from poor blood circulation which causes wounds to heal much slower than they would in a non-diabetic. 

What Is the Importance of Wound Care?

While it may not seem apparent with small ulcers on the foot, for diabetics, any size ulcer can become infected. Diabetics often also suffer from neuropathy, or nerve loss. This means they might not even feel when they have an ulcer on their foot. If the wound becomes severely infected, amputation may be necessary. Therefore, it is of the upmost importance to properly care for any and all foot wounds.

How to Care for Wounds

The best way to care for foot wounds is to prevent them. For diabetics, this means daily inspections of the feet for any signs of abnormalities or ulcers. It is also recommended to see a podiatrist several times a year for a foot inspection. If you do have an ulcer, run the wound under water to clear dirt from the wound; then apply antibiotic ointment to the wound and cover with a bandage. Bandages should be changed daily and keeping pressure off the wound is smart. It is advised to see a podiatrist, who can keep an eye on it.

If you have any questions, please feel free to contact our offices located in Chicago, IL . We offer the newest diagnostic and treatment technologies for all your foot care needs.

Read more about Wound Care
Connect with us
Leave Google Review for Dr. Catherine Minnick, DPM in Chicago, IL

Foot Doctor Catherine J. Minnick, DPM on Facebook Podiatrist Catherine J. Minnick, DPM on Twitter Chicago Podiatrist's Blog