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Saturday, 07 December 2019 00:00

Many diabetic patients are aware of the importance of properly taking care of wounds on their feet. Foot ulcers can be common in these types of patients, and can become worse as a result of damaged nerve endings that may accompany diabetes. This may cause the patient to lose feeling in the feet, making it possible that wounds on the feet are left undetected. If an existing wound becomes infected, it may develop into a foot ulcer. One of the first steps in treating a foot ulcer is to remove the affected wound tissue. This can be beneficial in helping the wound to drain, in addition to effectively examining the tissue that lies beneath it. Patients who have foot ulcers may be guided to wear a specific type of boot, or offloading device. This is a necessary step for successful healing. There are measures that can be taken which may help to prevent wounds on the feet. These can include examining the feet daily, washing and drying the feet thoroughly, and making sure blood glucose levels are within a normal range. If you have wounds on your feet, it is strongly suggested that you are under the care of a podiatrist who can help you to properly manage this condition

Wound care is an important part in dealing with diabetes. If you have diabetes and a foot wound or would like more information about wound care for diabetics, consult with Dr. Catherine J. Minnick from Illinois. Our doctor will assess your condition and provide you with quality foot and ankle treatment.

What Is Wound Care?

Wound care is the practice of taking proper care of a wound. This can range from the smallest to the largest of wounds. While everyone can benefit from proper wound care, it is much more important for diabetics. Diabetics often suffer from poor blood circulation which causes wounds to heal much slower than they would in a non-diabetic. 

What Is the Importance of Wound Care?

While it may not seem apparent with small ulcers on the foot, for diabetics, any size ulcer can become infected. Diabetics often also suffer from neuropathy, or nerve loss. This means they might not even feel when they have an ulcer on their foot. If the wound becomes severely infected, amputation may be necessary. Therefore, it is of the upmost importance to properly care for any and all foot wounds.

How to Care for Wounds

The best way to care for foot wounds is to prevent them. For diabetics, this means daily inspections of the feet for any signs of abnormalities or ulcers. It is also recommended to see a podiatrist several times a year for a foot inspection. If you do have an ulcer, run the wound under water to clear dirt from the wound; then apply antibiotic ointment to the wound and cover with a bandage. Bandages should be changed daily and keeping pressure off the wound is smart. It is advised to see a podiatrist, who can keep an eye on it.

If you have any questions, please feel free to contact our offices located in Chicago, IL. We offer the newest diagnostic and treatment technologies for all your foot care needs.

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Sunday, 01 December 2019 00:00

Common causes of a broken toe typically include a heavy object falling on one or more of your toes, or stubbing your toe against a piece of furniture. The affected toe may look swollen, bruised, and can be difficult to walk on. If the fracture is severe, the toe may look crooked and deformed, and this may cause severe pain and discomfort. Patients who have broken toes may choose to use buddy taping as a form of treatment. This method involves taping the broken toe to an adjacent toe, and can be effective in providing the stability that is necessary as the healing process occurs. After a proper diagnosis is performed, which typically involves having an X-ray taken, treatment can begin. If you have broken your toe, it is advised that you consult with a podiatrist who can help you to effectively manage this type of fracture.

A broken toe can be very painful and lead to complications if not properly fixed. If you have any concerns about your feet, contact Dr. Catherine J. Minnick from Illinois. Our doctor will treat your foot and ankle needs.

What to Know About a Broken Toe

Although most people try to avoid foot trauma such as banging, stubbing, or dropping heavy objects on their feet, the unfortunate fact is that it is a common occurrence. Given the fact that toes are positioned in front of the feet, they typically sustain the brunt of such trauma. When trauma occurs to a toe, the result can be a painful break (fracture).

Symptoms of a Broken Toe

  • Throbbing pain
  • Swelling
  • Bruising on the skin and toenail
  • The inability to move the toe
  • Toe appears crooked or disfigured
  • Tingling or numbness in the toe

Generally, it is best to stay off of the injured toe with the affected foot elevated.

Severe toe fractures may be treated with a splint, cast, and in some cases, minor surgery. Due to its position and the pressure it endures with daily activity, future complications can occur if the big toe is not properly treated.

If you have any questions please feel free to contact our offices located in Chicago, IL. We offer the newest diagnostic and treatment technologies for all your foot and ankle needs.

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Wednesday, 27 November 2019 00:00

If left untreated, an ingrown toenail can lead to greater issues. Give us a call, and get treated!

Monday, 25 November 2019 00:00

There is a portion of tissue that is found on the bottom of the foot. This is referred to as the plantar fascia, and its purpose is to connect the heel to the toes. Many patients suffer from plantar fasciitis, which may happen when this band of tissue becomes inflamed. This painful condition may occur as a result of wearing shoes that do not have adequate support, running on uneven surfaces, or from sudden weight gain. Some of the symptoms that are associated with this condition can consist of pain while walking after arising in the morning, and discomfort that is felt in the heel and surrounding areas. Relief may be found when the foot is elevated, in addition to performing specific foot stretches. If you feel you have developed plantar fasciitis, it is advised that you schedule a consultation with a podiatrist who can determine what the best treatment is for you.

Plantar fasciitis can be very painful and inconvenient. If you are experiencing heel pain or symptoms of plantar fasciitis, contact Dr. Catherine J. Minnick  from Illinois. Our doctor can provide the care you need to keep you pain-free and on your feet.

What Is Plantar Fasciitis?

Plantar fasciitis is the inflammation of the thick band of tissue that runs along the bottom of your foot, known as the plantar fascia, and causes mild to severe heel pain.

What Causes Plantar Fasciitis?

  • Excessive running
  • Non-supportive shoes
  • Overpronation
  • Repeated stretching and tearing of the plantar fascia

How Can It Be Treated?

  • Conservative measures – anti-inflammatories, ice packs, stretching exercises, physical therapy, orthotic devices
  • Shockwave therapy – sound waves are sent to the affected area to facilitate healing and are usually used for chronic cases of plantar fasciitis
  • Surgery – usually only used as a last resort when all else fails. The plantar fascia can be surgically detached from the heel

While very treatable, plantar fasciitis is definitely not something that should be ignored. Especially in severe cases, speaking to your doctor right away is highly recommended to avoid complications and severe heel pain. Your podiatrist can work with you to provide the appropriate treatment options tailored to your condition.

If you have any questions please feel free to contact our offices located in Chicago, IL. We offer the newest diagnostic and treatment technologies for all your foot and ankle needs.

Read more about Plantar Fasciitis
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