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Podiatry Chicago, IL main menu
Monday, 11 January 2021 00:00

When buying new running shoes, it is important to consider the distance you plan to run. For shorter distances, you may want to opt for lightweight shoes. For longer distances, your foot may require a shoe with more support and extra cushioning in the sole. The type of surface that you run on should also be considered. As your stride along the grip may change depending on the terrain. For this reason it is said not to wear the same running shoes on the road as you would for trail running. When you are ready to purchase running shoes, it is a good idea to go shopping in the late afternoon. Your feet naturally swell throughout the day. By shopping later in the day when your feet are at their largest, you can ensure that the shoes will not be too small or tight when you run. For more tips and tricks about finding the right running shoes, please consult with a podiatrist.

It is important to find shoes that fit you properly in order to avoid a variety of different foot problems. For more information about treatment, contact Dr. Catherine J. Minnick from Illinois. Our doctor will treat your foot and ankle needs.

Proper Shoe Fitting

Shoes have many different functions. They cushion our body weight, protect our feet, and allow us to safely play sports. You should always make sure that the shoes you wear fit you properly in order to avoid injuries and deformities such as: bunions, corns, calluses, hammertoes, plantar fasciitis, stress fractures, and more. It is important to note that although a certain pair of shoes might be a great fit for someone else, that doesn’t mean they will be a great fit for you. This is why you should always try on shoes before buying them to make sure they are worth the investment. Typically, shoes need to be replaced ever six months to one year of regular use.

Tips for Proper Shoe Fitting

  • Select a shoe that is shaped like your foot
  • Don’t buy shoes that fit too tight, expecting them to stretch to fit
  • Make sure there is enough space (3/8” to ½”) for your longest toe at the end of each shoe when you are standing up
  • Walk in the shoes to make sure they fit and feel right
  • Don’t select shoes by the size marked inside the shoe, but by how the shoe fits your foot

The shoes you buy should always feel as good as they look. Shoes that fit properly will last longer, feel better, and improve your way of life each day.

If you have any questions, please feel free to contact our offices located in Chicago, IL. We offer the newest diagnostic and treatment technologies for all your foot care needs.

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Monday, 04 January 2021 00:00

Pain and discomfort often accompanies the foot condition that is known as plantar fasciitis. It can occur as a result of an inflamed plantar fascia, which is located on the bottom of the foot. The Plantar fascia is a portion of tissue that connects the heel to the toes and is crucial in completing basic foot movements. Plantar fasciitis can develop from standing on hard surfaces for extended periods of time throughout the day, overuse, or from a sudden weight gain. Common symptoms can include heel pain after arising in the morning and difficulty walking. It is beneficial to properly stretch the feet before and after exercising, as this may be helpful in preventing plantar fasciitis. If you are afflicted with this condition, please consult with a podiatrist to learn about treatment options.

Plantar fasciitis is a common foot condition that is often caused by a strain injury. If you are experiencing heel pain or symptoms of plantar fasciitis, contact Dr. Catherine J. Minnick from Illinois. Our doctor can provide the care you need to keep you pain-free and on your feet.

What Is Plantar Fasciitis?

Plantar fasciitis is one of the most common causes of heel pain. The plantar fascia is a ligament that connects your heel to the front of your foot. When this ligament becomes inflamed, plantar fasciitis is the result. If you have plantar fasciitis you will have a stabbing pain that usually occurs with your first steps in the morning. As the day progresses and you walk around more, this pain will start to disappear, but it will return after long periods of standing or sitting.

What Causes Plantar Fasciitis?

  • Excessive running
  • Having high arches in your feet
  • Other foot issues such as flat feet
  • Pregnancy (due to the sudden weight gain)
  • Being on your feet very often

There are some risk factors that may make you more likely to develop plantar fasciitis compared to others. The condition most commonly affects adults between the ages of 40 and 60. It also tends to affect people who are obese because the extra pounds result in extra stress being placed on the plantar fascia.

Prevention

  • Take good care of your feet – Wear shoes that have good arch support and heel cushioning.
  • Maintain a healthy weight
  • If you are a runner, alternate running with other sports that won’t cause heel pain

There are a variety of treatment options available for plantar fasciitis along with the pain that accompanies it. Additionally, physical therapy is a very important component in the treatment process. It is important that you meet with your podiatrist to determine which treatment option is best for you.

If you have any questions, please feel free to contact our offices located in Chicago, IL. We offer the newest diagnostic and treatment technologies for all your foot care needs.

 

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Monday, 28 December 2020 00:00

People with diabetes also often have poor circulation in the lower limbs as well as damaged nerve function, known as neuropathy. Neuropathy can result in pain, numbness, tingling, or a loss of sensation in the feet. The combination of a loss of sensation and poor blood flow in the feet can be particularly dangerous, as it makes the development of diabetic foot ulcers more likely. Diabetic foot ulcers are slow-healing wounds on the bottom of the feet. Left unnoticed and untreated, the wounds can grow, become infected, and lead to serious complications, such as tissue death and amputation. It is very important to inspect the feet daily to detect wounds and other potentially harmful changes early. If you have diabetes and notice any injuries, pain, or other changes in your feet, it is suggested that you see a podiatrist for treatment.  

Wound care is an important part in dealing with diabetes. If you have diabetes and a foot wound or would like more information about wound care for diabetics, consult with Dr. Catherine J. Minnick from Illinois. Our doctor will assess your condition and provide you with quality foot and ankle treatment.

What Is Wound Care?

Wound care is the practice of taking proper care of a wound. This can range from the smallest to the largest of wounds. While everyone can benefit from proper wound care, it is much more important for diabetics. Diabetics often suffer from poor blood circulation which causes wounds to heal much slower than they would in a non-diabetic. 

What Is the Importance of Wound Care?

While it may not seem apparent with small ulcers on the foot, for diabetics, any size ulcer can become infected. Diabetics often also suffer from neuropathy, or nerve loss. This means they might not even feel when they have an ulcer on their foot. If the wound becomes severely infected, amputation may be necessary. Therefore, it is of the upmost importance to properly care for any and all foot wounds.

How to Care for Wounds

The best way to care for foot wounds is to prevent them. For diabetics, this means daily inspections of the feet for any signs of abnormalities or ulcers. It is also recommended to see a podiatrist several times a year for a foot inspection. If you do have an ulcer, run the wound under water to clear dirt from the wound; then apply antibiotic ointment to the wound and cover with a bandage. Bandages should be changed daily and keeping pressure off the wound is smart. It is advised to see a podiatrist, who can keep an eye on it.

If you have any questions, please feel free to contact our offices located in Chicago, IL. We offer the newest diagnostic and treatment technologies for all your foot care needs.

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Monday, 21 December 2020 00:00

Gout is a painful, inflammatory form of arthritis. Those affected will typically feel an intense stiffness in the joints of their feet, particularly in the big toe. Schedule a visit to learn about how gout can be managed and treated.

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