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Monday, 15 April 2019 00:00

A large bony protrusion on the side of the big toe is indicative of a condition that is referred to as a bunion. Foot pain may be a common symptom if a bunion exists, and it may be difficult to wear shoes. There are several reasons why bunions may develop. These may include a genetic disposition or a possible injury that has occurred to the foot. Research has shown that bunions are less common in non-western countries, and this may possibly be due to the type of footwear that is worn. Mild relief may be found while using a bunion pad, in addition to wearing shoes that do not cramp the toes. If you have developed a bunion, speak to a podiatrist who can offer advice on effective treatment options.

If you are suffering from bunion pain, contact Dr. Catherine J. Minnick of Illinois. Our doctor can provide the care you need to keep you pain-free and on your feet.

What Is a Bunion?

Bunions are painful bony bumps that usually develop on the inside of the foot at the joint of the big toe. As the deformity increases over time, it may become painful to walk and wear shoes. Women are more likely to exacerbate existing bunions since they often wear tight, narrow shoes that shift their toes together. Bunion pain can be relieved by wearing wider shoes with enough room for the toes.

Causes

  • Genetics – some people inherit feet that are more prone to bunion development
  • Inflammatory Conditions - rheumatoid arthritis and polio may cause bunion development

Symptoms

  • Redness and inflammation
  • Pain and tenderness
  • Callus or corns on the bump
  • Restricted motion in the big toe

In order to diagnose your bunion, your podiatrist may ask about your medical history, symptoms, and general health. Your doctor might also order an x-ray to take a closer look at your feet. Nonsurgical treatment options include orthotics, padding, icing, changes in footwear, and medication. If nonsurgical treatments don’t alleviate your bunion pain, surgery may be necessary.

If you have any questions, please feel free to contact our offices located in Chicago, IL. We offer the newest diagnostic and treatment technologies for all your foot care needs.

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Monday, 08 April 2019 00:00

Athlete’s foot is a common foot condition that many people experience. It typically affects the area between the toes in addition to the bottom of the feet. There are several symptoms that are associated with this ailment. These may include redness, dry areas in the affected portions of skin, or extreme itchiness. This contagious fungal infection is generally found in public places, which may include community pools, shower room floors, and surrounding areas. Patients who have certain existing medical conditions may have an increased risk of getting athlete’s foot. These include a weak immune system, eczema, or certain allergies. Mild relief can be found while using an anti-fungal spray. For stubborn and severe cases of athlete’s foot, it is strongly suggested that you consult with a podiatrist who can properly treat your condition.

Athlete’s foot is an inconvenient condition that can be easily reduced with the proper treatment. If you have any concerns about your feet and ankles, contact Dr. Catherine J. Minnick from Illinois.  Our doctor will treat your foot and ankle needs.

Athlete’s Foot: The Sole Story

Athlete's foot, also known as tinea pedis, can be an extremely contagious foot infection. It is commonly contracted in public changing areas and bathrooms, dormitory style living quarters, around locker rooms and public swimming pools, or anywhere your feet often come into contact with other people.

Solutions to Combat Athlete’s Foot

  • Hydrate your feet by using lotion
  • Exfoliate
  • Buff off nails
  • Use of anti-fungal products
  • Examine your feet and visit your doctor if any suspicious blisters or cuts develop

Athlete’s foot can cause many irritating symptoms such as dry and flaking skin, itching, and redness. Some more severe symptoms can include bleeding and cracked skin, intense itching and burning, and even pain when walking. In the worst cases, Athlete’s foot can cause blistering as well. Speak to your podiatrist for a better understanding of the different causes of Athlete’s foot, as well as help in determining which treatment options are best for you.

If you have any questions please feel free to contact our offices located in Chicago, IL. We offer the newest diagnostic and treatment technologies for all your foot and ankle needs.

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Monday, 01 April 2019 00:00

The healing process is comprised of different stages when wounds are located on the feet. It begins with blood vessels becoming constricted at the sight of the wound. This may be effective in preventing blood loss. When this is completed, collagen forms inside the wound, and this may enable the wound to close. The last stage occurs as the body produces additional collagen, and the wound will gradually disappear. There may be obstacles that exist which can prevent proper wound healing. These may include poor dietary choices, smoking, or medical conditions such as diabetes or immune disorders. When a wound develops, it is beneficial to clean the area by gently washing it, and removing any dirt that may be present. If you have a wound on your foot, it is suggested to speak to a podiatrist who can properly treat this ailment by applying the appropriate dressing, and prescribing the correct medication.

Wound care is an important part in dealing with diabetes. If you have diabetes and a foot wound or would like more information about wound care for diabetics, consult with Dr. Catherine J. Minnick from Illinois. Our doctor will assess your condition and provide you with quality foot and ankle treatment.

What is Wound Care?

Wound care is the practice of taking proper care of a wound. This can range from the smallest to the largest of wounds. While everyone can benefit from proper wound care, it is much more important for diabetics. Diabetics often suffer from poor blood circulation which causes wounds to heal much slower than they would in a non-diabetic. 

What is the Importance of Wound Care?

While it may not seem apparent with small ulcers on the foot, for diabetics, any size ulcer can become infected. Diabetics often also suffer from neuropathy, or nerve loss. This means they might not even feel when they have an ulcer on their foot. If the wound becomes severely infected, amputation may be necessary. Therefore, it is of the upmost importance to properly care for any and all foot wounds.

How to Care for Wounds

The best way to care for foot wounds is to prevent them. For diabetics, this means daily inspections of the feet for any signs of abnormalities or ulcers. It is also recommended to see a podiatrist several times a year for a foot inspection. If you do have an ulcer, run the wound under water to clear dirt from the wound; then apply antibiotic ointment to the wound and cover with a bandage. Bandages should be changed daily and keeping pressure off the wound is smart. It is advised to see a podiatrist, who can keep an eye on it.

If you have any questions, please feel free to contact our offices located in Chicago, IL. We offer the newest diagnostic and treatment technologies for all your foot care needs.

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Monday, 25 March 2019 00:00

A swollen nerve in the foot may be indicative of a condition that is referred to as Morton’s neuroma. It is described as a growth of nerve tissue that exists between the third and fourth toes.This ailment may cause adjoining tendons and ligaments to put pressure on the nerve, which may cause inflammation and pain. Additional symptoms may include numbness or tingling, and some patients may experience a burning sensation. Pain and discomfort are often felt in the bottom of the foot, near the base of the third and fourth toes. There may be effective exercises that can be performed, which which may aid in improving strength in the arch of the foot. These may include stretching the lower leg, and the plantar fascia, which is the tissue that runs along the bottom of the foot. If you feel you have Morton’s neuroma, it is suggested that you schedule a consultation with a podiatrist who can guide you toward the proper treatment.

Morton’s neuroma is a very uncomfortable condition to live with. If you think you have Morton’s neuroma, contact Dr. Catherine J. Minnick of Illinois. Our doctor will attend to all of your foot and ankle needs and answer any of your related questions.  

Morton’s Neuroma

Morton's neuroma is a painful foot condition that commonly affects the areas between the second and third or third and fourth toe, although other areas of the foot are also susceptible. Morton’s neuroma is caused by an inflamed nerve in the foot that is being squeezed and aggravated by surrounding bones.

What Increases the Chances of Having Morton’s Neuroma?

  • Ill-fitting high heels or shoes that add pressure to the toe or foot
  • Jogging, running or any sport that involves constant impact to the foot
  • Flat feet, bunions, and any other foot deformities

Morton’s neuroma is a very treatable condition. Orthotics and shoe inserts can often be used to alleviate the pain on the forefront of the feet. In more severe cases, corticosteroids can also be prescribed. In order to figure out the best treatment for your neuroma, it’s recommended to seek the care of a podiatrist who can diagnose your condition and provide different treatment options.

If you have any questions, please feel free to contact our offices located in Chicago, IL. We offer the newest diagnostic and treatment technologies for all your foot care needs.

Read more about What is Morton's Neuroma?
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